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Title: Determination of plant growth rate and growth temperature range from measurement of physiological parameters

Author: Criddle, R. S.; Smith, B. N.; Hansen, L. D.; Church, J. N.;

Date: 2001

Source: In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 251-258.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Many factors influence species range and diversity, but temperature and temperature variability are always major global determinants, irrespective of local constraints. On a global scale, the ranges of many taxa have been observed to increase and their diversity decrease with increasing latitude. On a local scale, gradients in species distribution are observable with increasing altitude. These gradients in species distribution have not previously been linked to physiology. In this communication, the gradients are proposed to be a consequence of the physical laws governing energy transduction, acting through natural selection in response to environmental temperature variability. Measurements of rates of energy production and its use in anabolic metabolism as a function of temperature show that respiratory rates and efficiency of green plants are closely adapted to diurnal temperature changes and mean temperatures of the native environment. Optimization of energy production and use by respiratory metabolism along global gradients in temperature and temperature variability is a genome x environment interaction, thus is a fundamental cause of the latitudinal/altitudinal gradients of species range and diversity.

Keywords: wildland shrubs, genetics, biodiversity, disturbance, ecophysiology, community ecology

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Citation:


Criddle, R. S.; Smith, B. N.; Hansen, L. D.; Church, J. N. 2001. Determination of plant growth rate and growth temperature range from measurement of physiological parameters. In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 251-258.

 


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