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Publication Information

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Title: Effects of salinity and temperature on respiratory metabolism of Salicornia utahensis from a Great Basin playa

Author: Harris, Lyneen C.; Khan, M. Ajmal; Zou, Jiping; Smith, Bruce N.; Hansen, Lee D.;

Date: 2001

Source: In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 265-270.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Plants that live in the desert playas of the Great Basin must simultaneously tolerate very high concentrations of salt and high temperature. This study characterizes the respiratory metabolism of one species growing in this environment. An isothermal calorimetric method was used to measure the dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) of stem tissue from Salicornia utahensis grown in the greenhouse or in constant temperature growth chambers at six different concentrations of NaCl solutions ranging from 0 to 1.0 M. Metabolic rates were measured at eight temperatures from 5 to 40 °C. Temperature and salt dependencies of q and RCO2 were used to model response of both growth and substrate carbon conversion efficiency. Salt and temperature stresses are not additive, but rather oppose one another, in other words, the higher the salt, the higher the temperature the plants will tolerate and vice versa. The maximum temperature tolerated is an approximately linear function of salt concentration, being about 20 °C at 0 M salt and about 32 °C at 1 M. Concentration of the endogenous osmoticant glycinebetaine increased with salt and temperature but only to about 20 °C and 900 mM NaCl.

Keywords: wildland shrubs, genetics, biodiversity, disturbance, ecophysiology, community ecology

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Harris, Lyneen C.; Khan, M. Ajmal; Zou, Jiping; Smith, Bruce N.; Hansen, Lee D. 2001. Effects of salinity and temperature on respiratory metabolism of Salicornia utahensis from a Great Basin playa. In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 265-270.

 


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