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Title: Long-shoot/short-shoot phenomenon in woody plants

Author: Sosebee, Ronald E.;

Date: 2001

Source: In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 306-307.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Shoot growth in shrubs is often overlooked as an important component of phenological development in woody plants. However, shoot growth dictates the pattern of growth of deciduous trees or shrubs, especially following defoliation or canopy damage. In general, woody shoots are divided into short- and long-shoots. Short-shoots, sometimes called "spurs," are reproductive shoots (in other words, spurs on an apple (Malus pumila) tree). The longshoots, sometimes called "watersprouts," are vegetative shoots. From a management perspective, herbicidal control of shrubs (in other words, mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa)) with long-shoots is highly ineffective. All of the energy synthesized by the plant is translocated to the long-shoot and converted to structural materials; in other words, stem growth. Similarly, one could postulate that browsing during the long-shoot stage would not significantly impair shrub viability if the shrub was healthy and vigorous at the time of browsing. Likewise, pruning shrubs during long-shoot growth (in a lawn or garden) stimulates "wolf-like growth" of the shrub. In contrast, herbicidal control of shrubs during the short-shoot stage usually conveys a high degree of success. Likewise, pruning or defoliation during the short-shoot stage significantly reduces fruit production.

Keywords: wildland shrubs, genetics, biodiversity, disturbance, ecophysiology, community ecology

Publication Notes:

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Citation:


Sosebee, Ronald E. 2001. Long-shoot/short-shoot phenomenon in woody plants. In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 306-307.

 


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