Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (65 KB)

Title: Field test of a new Australian method of rangeland monitoring

Author: Mayne, Suzanne; West, Neil;

Date: 2001

Source: In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 315-317.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Managers need more efficient means of monitoring changes on the lands they manage. Accordingly, a new Australian approach was field tested and compared to the Daubenmire method of assessing plant cover, litter, and bare soil. The study area was a 2 mile wide by 30.15 mile long strip, mostly covered by salt desert shrub ecosystem types, centered along the SE boundary of the Eagle Bombing Range in NW Utah. Paired T analyses were used to see what differences in condition could be detected between Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Air Force lands occupying the same ecological sites. Because of low statistical power of the test, no statistically significant differences were detected between ownerships. We did however, find some numerical differences illustrating the strengths and shortcomings of the two approaches. The Australian technique was less time consuming but not more readily repeated than the Daubenmire technique. The Australian technique focuses on the importance of protecting soils against erosion. The Daubenmire technique allows collection of data for addressing biodiversity and weed invasion issues. Either or both methods can be done on the same locations, thus, the managers’ objectives and budgetary considerations should guide choices of method(s) employed.

Keywords: wildland shrubs, genetics, biodiversity, disturbance, ecophysiology, community ecology

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Mayne, Suzanne; West, Neil. 2001. Field test of a new Australian method of rangeland monitoring. In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 315-317.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.