Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (130 KB)

Title: Rate of increase of redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii) canopy cover in western Texas: Ecological and economic implications

Author: Ueckert, Darrell N.; Phillips, Robert A.; Petersen, Joseph L.; Wu, X. Ben;

Date: 2001

Source: In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 347-351.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii) is a major problem on Texas rangelands, yet little is known about the rate it is increasing. This study estimated long-term rates of change of redberry juniper canopy cover on undisturbed sites and adjacent sites that were either chained or grubbed at five locations in western Texas. Juniper cover was estimated from positive transparencies of aerial photographs by the line intercept method using a 10-X monocular lense with a vernier. Juniper cover increased at an average rate of 0.37 percentage unit year-1 (range 0.12 to 0.59) on undisturbed sites from the mid 1950s or early 1960s to the late 1990s (34 to 41 years). Following chaining or grubbing treatments during 1970 to 1978, juniper cover increased at an average rate of 1.00 percentage unit year-1, which was significantly faster than the average rate of 0.5 percentage unit year-1 on untreated rangeland for the same time interval. Juniper cover returned to pre-treatment levels in an average of 20.6 years (range 11 to 29) following mechanical control. The annual increment in herbaceous production was predicted at -2 to -4 kg ha-1 (-1.8 to -3.6 lb acre-1) for sites or periods where juniper cover was increasing at low rates and at -15 to -23 kg ha-1 (-13 to -21 lb acre-1) where juniper cover was increasing at high rates. Data from this study suggest that initial or maintenance control practices should be installed before juniper cover exceeds about 12 percent.

Keywords: wildland shrubs, genetics, biodiversity, disturbance, ecophysiology, community ecology

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Ueckert, Darrell N.; Phillips, Robert A.; Petersen, Joseph L.; Wu, X. Ben. 2001. Rate of increase of redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii) canopy cover in western Texas: Ecological and economic implications. In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 347-351.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.