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Title: Habitat improvement for wildlife in North-Central Sonora, Mexico

Author: Martin-Rivera, Martha; Ibarra-Flores, Fernando; Guthery, Fred S.; Kublesky, William P. Jr.; Camou-Luders, Gustavo; Fimbres-Preciado, Jesus; Johnson-Gordon, Donald;

Date: 2001

Source: In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 356-360.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Native vegetation of semiarid grasslands and desert ecosystems that comprise the Arbosufrutescent Desert scrub vegetation in north-central Sonora has been degraded by overgrazing, drought, farming, woodcutting, and a host of other activities over the past century. Several studies were conducted at "Rancho Grande" and at "Rancho El Carrizo," Sonora from 1992 to 1999 to evaluate the effect of several range improvement practices on wildlife habitat. Twenty-five-thousand seedlings of eight native shrubs and trees were transplanted on a site in north-central Sonora. Survival rates among species varied from 55 to 84 percent 1 year after transplanting and from 10 to 41 percent 3 years after planting. Reestablishment of native shrubs represents a promising technique that could restore native woody vegetation on degraded ecosystems that lack diversity. Habitat management by disking and shredding coupled with improvement in grazing management with shortduration grazing, have also resulted in improved native herbaceous conditions on thousands of acres of private ranches. These results are encouraging. The potential impact that re-establishment of native shrubs, control of undesirable brush species, and improvements in grazing management may have on wildlife occupying rangelands in north-central Sonora will be discussed.

Keywords: wildland shrubs, genetics, biodiversity, disturbance, ecophysiology, community ecology

Publication Notes:

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Martin-Rivera, Martha; Ibarra-Flores, Fernando; Guthery, Fred S.; Kublesky, William P., Jr.; Camou-Luders, Gustavo; Fimbres-Preciado, Jesus; Johnson-Gordon, Donald. 2001. Habitat improvement for wildlife in North-Central Sonora, Mexico. In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 356-360.

 


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