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Title: Changing resource management paradigms, traditional ecological knowledge, and non-timber forest products

Author: Davidson-Hunt, Iain J.; Berkes, Fikret.;

Date: 2001

Source: In: Davidson-Hunt, Iain; Duchesne, Luc C.; Zasada, John C., eds. Forest communities in the third millennium: linking research, business, and policy toward a sustainable non-timber forest product sector, proceedings of the meeting; 1999 October 1-4; Kenora, Ontario, Canada. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-217. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 78-92.

Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: We begin this paper by exploring the shift now occurring in the science that provides the theoretical basis for resource management practice. The concepts of traditional ecological knowledge and traditional management systems are presented next to provide the background for an examination of resilient landscapes that emerge through the work and play of humans. These examples of traditional ecological knowledge and traditional management systems suggest that it is important to focus on managing ecological processes, instead of products, and to use integrated ecosystem management. Traditional knowledge is often discussed by resource management agencies as a source of information to be incorporated into management practice; in this paper we go further and explore traditional knowledge as an arena of dialogue between resource managers and harvesters. To enter into this dialogue will require mutual respect among managers and users for each others’ knowledge and practice. Such a dialogue could move forest management paradigms beyond our current view of "timber or parks" and toward one of truly integrated use.

Publication Notes:

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Citation:


Davidson-Hunt, Iain J.; Berkes, Fikret. 2001. Changing resource management paradigms, traditional ecological knowledge, and non-timber forest products. In: Davidson-Hunt, Iain; Duchesne, Luc C.; Zasada, John C., eds. Forest communities in the third millennium: linking research, business, and policy toward a sustainable non-timber forest product sector, proceedings of the meeting; 1999 October 1-4; Kenora, Ontario, Canada. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-217. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Research Station: 78-92.

 


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