Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (2.2 MB)

Title: Modeling hazardous fire potential within a completed fuel treatment network in the northern Sierra Nevada

Author: Collins, Brandon M.; Kramer, Heather A.; Menning, Kurt; Dillingham, Colin; Saah, David; Stine, Peter A.; Stephens, Scott L.;

Date: 2013

Source: Forest Ecology and Management

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: We built on previous work by performing a more in-depth examination of a completed landscape fuel treatment network. Our specific objectives were: (1) model hazardous fire potential with and without the treatment network, (2) project hazardous fire potential over several decades to assess fuel treatment network longevity, and (3) assess fuel treatment effectiveness and longevity over a range of two critical fire modeling inputs: surface fuel models and canopy base height. Modeling results demonstrate reductions in the hazardous fire potential across much of the treated landscape, relative to the untreated condition. These reductions persist throughout our modeling duration, 2010–2050. However, there was a strong effect of varying ingrowth levels, which were manipulated to generate different estimates of canopy base height over time, on hazardous fire potential over time. Under the low ingrowth level, which resulted in the highest predictions of canopy base height, hazardous fire potential steadily declined over time for the untreated landscape condition. The effect of varying fuel models in treated areas had much less impact on hazardous fire potential, indicating a robust treatment effect. Our results demonstrate a coordinated fuel treatment network that incorporates local knowledge of fire weather and likely fire behavior patterns can have a substantial impact on reducing hazardous fire potential. However, even with planned maintenance of the treatment network, hazard grows in untreated areas over time, resulting in an increase in overall fire hazard. This suggests additional treatments, including fire use, would be necessary to maintain low hazardous fire potential.

Keywords: Fuel treatment, Fire management, Fire behavior modeling, Fuel model, Ladder fuel

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Collins, Brandon M.; Kramer, Heather A.; Menning, Kurt; Dillingham, Colin; Saah, David; Stine, Peter A.; Stephens, Scott L. 2013. Modeling hazardous fire potential within a completed fuel treatment network in the northern Sierra Nevada. Forest Ecology and Management. 310: 156-166.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.