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Title: Screening Sitka spruce for resistance to weevil damage in British Columbia

Author: Alfaro, René I.; King, John N.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J., tech. coords. Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-240. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 271-275

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The white pine weevil, Pissodes strobi (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), has serious impacts on Sitka (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carrière), Engelmann (P. engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.), and white spruce (P. glauca (Moench) Voss) plantations in British Columbia (BC), Canada. This weevil attacks the terminal leader of the tree, causing significant growth loss and deformities. Genetic resistance to this insect was demonstrated in early provenance trials in BC. This encouraged us to initiate a systematic search for resistant trees to confirm this resistance and to improve parent source selections, especially in the Sitka spruce breeding program. Test plantations were initiated and, to accelerate the screening process and create a uniform weevil pressure, insect populations were artificially augmented at many of these trial sites. Artificial infestation provided quick and effective screening and allowed us to proceed with the construction of an F-1 population, and to understand the mechanisms and heritability of resistance. Seed orchards have been established and weevil resistant seedlings are now available for operational planting.

Keywords: spruce, weevil, genetic resistance, tree improvement, pest management

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Alfaro, René I.; King, John N. 2012. Screening Sitka spruce for resistance to weevil damage in British Columbia. In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J., tech. coords. Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-240. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 271-275.

 


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