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Title: Range-wide genetic variability in Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii): examining disease resistance, growth, and survival in a common garden study

Author: Elliott, Marianne; Chastagner, Gary A.; Dermott, Gil; Kanaskie, Alan; Sniezko, Richard A.; Hamlin, Jim.;

Date: 2012

Source: In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J., tech. coords. Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-240. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 295-300

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii Pursh, Ericaceae) is an important evergreen hardwood species in Pacific Northwest (PNW) forests that provides food and habitat for wildlife and has high value in urban environments. Reeves (2007) indicates that Pacific madrone provides habitat for numerous wildlife species, especially cavity-nesting birds. Its evergreen foliage provides browse, especially in the winter, for a number of animals. The berries are an important food for deer, birds, and other small mammals because they are produced in large quantities and may persist on the tree in winter when alternative food sources are limited (Dayton 1931). Reeves (2007) also indicates that it provides excellent erosion control and slope stabilization and is highly prized as an ornamental species for its crooked beauty, colorful bark, showy flowers, and brightly colored fruits. Pacific madrone is relatively drought tolerant, which makes it desirable in urban habitats. Native American tribes have also used various portions of this tree for food, utensils, and medicinal purposes (Arno et al. 1977, Dayton 1931).

Keywords: forest disease and insect resistance, evolutionary biology, climate change, durable resistance

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Elliott, Marianne; Chastagner, Gary A.; Dermott, Gil; Kanaskie, Alan; Sniezko, Richard A.; Hamlin, Jim. 2012. Range-wide genetic variability in Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii): examining disease resistance, growth, and survival in a common garden study. In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J., tech. coords. Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-240. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. pp. 295-300.

 


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