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Title: Tree-mediated interactions between the jack pine budworm and a mountain pine beetle fungal

Author: Erbilgin, Nadir; Colgan, Jessie;

Date: 2012

Source: In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J., tech. coords. Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-240. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. p. 302

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Coniferous trees deploy a combination of constitutive (pre-existing) and induced (post-invasion) structural and biochemical defenses against invaders. Induced responses can also alter host suitability for other organisms sharing the same host, which may result in indirect, plant-mediated, interactions between different species of attacking organisms. Current range and host expansion of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae, MPB) from lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Loudon)-dominated forests to the jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.)-dominated boreal forests provides a unique opportunity to investigate whether the colonization of jack pine by MPB will be affected by induced responses of jack pine to a native herbaceous insect species, the jack pine budworm (Choristoneura pinus pinus, JPBW). We simulated MPB attacks with one of its fungal associates, Grosmannia clavigera, and tested induction of either herbivory by JPBW or inoculation with the fungus followed by a challenge treatment with the other organism on jack pine seedlings and measured and compared monoterpene responses in needle. There was clear evidence of an increase in jack pine resistance to G. clavigera with prior herbivory, indicated by smaller lesions in response to fungal inoculations. In contrast, although needle monoterpenes greatly increased after G. clavigera inoculation and continued to increase during the herbivory challenge, JPBW growth was not affected. However, JPBW increased feeding rate to possibly compensate for altered host quality. Jack pine responses varied greatly and depended on whether seedlings were treated with single or multiple organisms, and their order of damage.

Keywords: forest disease and insect resistance, evolutionary biology, climate change, durable resistance

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Erbilgin, Nadir; Colgan, Jessie. 2012. Tree-mediated interactions between the jack pine budworm and a mountain pine beetle fungal. In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J., tech. coords. Proceedings of the fourth international workshop on the genetics of host-parasite interactions in forestry: Disease and insect resistance in forest trees. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-240. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. p. 302.

 


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