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Title: Section summary: Remote sensing

Author: Margono, Belinda Arunarwati;

Date: 2013

Source: In: Mortenson, Leif A.; Halperin, James J.; Manley, Patricia N.; Turner, Rich L., eds. Proceedings of the international workshop on monitoring forest degradation in Southeast Asia. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-246. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 13-15

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Remote sensing is an important data source for monitoring the change of forest cover, in terms of both total removal of forest cover (deforestation), and change of canopy cover, structure and forest ecosystem services that result in forest degradation. In the context of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), forest degradation monitoring requires information regarding the degree of forest disturbance that results in a reduction in carbon stock within a specific time interval. Currently, remote sensing data does not directly provide readily available information on how much carbon has been released from a disturbed forest. In this regard, the integration between remote sensing data and field/ground based measurement is key. While many types of remote sensing can detect total loss of forest cover (deforestation), it is more challenging but still feasible for remote sensing data to detect changes in the extent of remaining forests that have been disturbed. Advanced techniques for analyzing remote sensing data are able to roughly estimate the area of disturbance; however it should be equipped with sufficient field verification. Field data is needed to provide estimates about how much biomass or carbon has been removed per unit area of the disturbance.

Keywords: forest degradation monitoring, Southeast Asia, climate change, carbon

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Margono, Belinda Arunarwati. 2013. Section summary: Remote sensing. In: Mortenson, Leif A.; Halperin, James J.; Manley, Patricia N.; Turner, Rich L., eds. Proceedings of the international workshop on monitoring forest degradation in Southeast Asia. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-246. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 13-15.

 


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