Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (463 KB)

Title: Consequences of salinity and freezing stress for two populations of Quercus virginiana Mill

Author: Kurtz, Cassandra M.; Savage, Jessica A.; Huang, I-Yu; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine.;

Date: 2013

Source: Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society. 140(2): 145-156.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Climate change is of increasing concern in coastal forests where rising sea levels could lead to dramatic shifts in ecosystem composition. To investigate how inundation may impact coastal ecosystems, we examined the sensitivity of Quercus virginiana Mill., a dominant tree in the southeastern U.S., to increased soil salinity and examined whether high salinity could increase its susceptibility to freezing damage (-10 °C). In a greenhouse, we examined the effect of three salt treatments (0-6 ppt) on acorn development and sapling physiology. We examined samples collected from two populations: inland Florida (FL) and coastal North Carolina (NC). We found that higher salt concentrations did not affect acorn germination, but did retard emergence. In the sapling stage, high salinity was more detrimental to plants from the FL population, causing greater declines in photosynthetic rates, water use efficiency, and dark quantum yield. FL plants also demonstrated a lower freezing tolerance than NC plants but freezing temperatures did not exacerbate effects of salt stress. Our data demonstrate important population-level differences in the salt and freezing tolerance of Q. virginiana. Since salt tolerance is important to the recruitment, growth, and survival of coastal Quercus species, this research can help with future conservation and management of this important species.

Keywords: chlorophyll fluorescence, freeze tolerance, Quercus virginiana, salt tolerance

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Kurtz, Cassandra M.; Savage, Jessica A.; Huang, I-Yu; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine. 2013. Consequences of salinity and freezing stress for two populations of Quercus virginiana Mill. (Fagaceae) grown in a common garden. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society. 140(2): 145-156.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.