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Title: Phytosanitation: A systematic approach to disease prevention

Author: Landis, Thomas D.;

Date: 2013

Source: In: Haase, D. L.; Pinto, J. R.; Wilkinson, K. M., technical coordinators. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2012. Proceedings RMRS-P-69. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 97-101.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Phytosanitation is not a new concept but has received renewed attention due to the increasing threat of nursery spread Phytophthora ramorum (PRAM), the fungus-like pathogen that causes Sudden Oak Death. This disease has the potental to become the most serious forest pest since white pine blister rust and chestnut blight. Phytosanitation can help prevent the spread of this and other pathogens to or from nursery operations. Phytosanitation can most simply be viewed as an input-output model: prevent pests from entering your nursery and make certain that your plants are not carrying pests when they leave your nursery for sale or outplanting. Two major approaches to phytosanitation can be employed. The systems approach is based on a Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points and comprehensive programs that have been developed for ornamental nurseries can easily be modified for forest, conservation, and native plant facilities. A second approach based on target pests might be easier for smaller nurseries with limited funds and manpower. Here, the idea is to learn as much as possible about pests that are found in your nursery or ones, like Phytophthora ramorum , that could threaten it. By focusing on the type of pest and its methods of spread, nurseries can adapt their scouting and cultural practices to minimize adverse affects. Because their stock is outplanted directly into forests and other wildland plant communities, nursery managers should be especially vigilant to make sure that PRAM isn’t spread to or from their operation.

Keywords: nursery, forest, native plant, seedling, Phytophthora ramorum (PRAM)

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Citation:


Landis, Thomas D. 2013. Phytosanitation: A systematic approach to disease prevention. In: Haase, D. L.; Pinto, J. R.; Wilkinson, K. M., technical coordinators. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2012. Proceedings RMRS-P-69. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 97-101.

 


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