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Publication Information

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Title: Cumulative effects: Managing natural resources for resilience in the urban context

Author: Low, Sarah C.;

Date: 2014

Source: In: Sample, V. Alaric; Bixler, R. Patrick, eds. Forest conservation and management in the Anthropocene: Conference proceedings. Proceedings. RMRS-P-71. Fort Collins, CO: US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 393-401.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Cities throughout the United States have started developing policies and plans that prioritize the installation of green infrastructure for the reduction of stormwater runoff. The installation of green infrastructure as a managed asset involves relying on natural resources to provide a predictable ecosystem service, stormwater retention. The placement of green infrastructure in urban areas may result in additional ecosystem services, such as climate change resilience. While climate change mitigation may not be the goal for the installation, green infrastructure may provide the value-added benefit of reducing local temperatures, reducing flooding associated with frequent severe storms, carbon dioxide sequestration, and reducing energy needs. While the benefits of installing green infrastructure may be significant, installing and managing natural resources in urban areas is not without its challenges. In the urban environment, it can be hard to find physical opportunities for installation and complicated to get permission due to conflicting ideas about how an area should be used. A lack of understanding about how plants will survive in harsh environments can make designing green infrastructure difficult and can increase the long-term maintenance costs. Cities are often learning as they go and experimenting to discover what works best. The science of green infrastructure is developing alongside practice; therefore, research is not always informing the decisions that are made in terms of design, installation, management, and outreach. Supporting local efforts to increase green infrastructure may require assistance not just with the development of national policy and local policy, but also through the development of research to support and guide design and decision-making, capacity building around community engagement, and methods for equitably distributing resources.

Keywords: forest conservation, management, Anthropocene, climate change

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Citation:


Low, Sarah C. 2014. Cumulative effects: Managing natural resources for resilience in the urban context. In: Sample, V. Alaric; Bixler, R. Patrick, eds. Forest conservation and management in the Anthropocene: Conference proceedings. Proceedings. RMRS-P-71. Fort Collins, CO: US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 393-401.

 


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