Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (88 KB)

Title: Plant community responses to livestock grazing: An assessment of alternative management practices in a semiarid grassland

Author: Loeser, Matthew R.; Sisk, Thomas D.; Crews, Timothy E.;

Date: 2001

Source: In: Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 80-87.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: One of the most prevalent land-use practices in the American Southwest, and one of the most contentious issues among land-use policymakers, is the grazing of domestic livestock. In an effort to contribute scientific understanding to this debate, we have designed experiments comparing the effects of alternative grazing regimes on plant communities. In a semiarid grassland of northern Arizona, we have implemented a replicated study of four treatments: (1) low-intensity, long-duration grazing rotations; (2) high-intensity, short-duration rotations (Holistic Resource Management-style grazing); (3) very high intensity, short duration grazing (to simulate herd impact); and (4) livestock exclosure. Beginning in 1997, we conducted annual surveys of the plant communities with Modified-Whittaker plots. Preliminary results suggest that interannual variability affecting all study plots is high, and that these alternative management strategies do not have dramatic short-term effects on the plant community. Comparisons of native and exotic species richness, as well as ground cover of grasses and forbs, showed no consistent pattern due to treatment over a 3-year period. Our results suggest that the effects of alternative livestock management styles in the semiarid grasslands studied are modest, at least in the short-term, and that future plant monitoring programs would greatly benefit from a multiscale sampling design.

Keywords: ponderosa pine, ecosystem management, landscape management, restoration, conservation, fire behavior, cost effectiveness analysis

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Loeser, Matthew R.; Sisk, Thomas D.; Crews, Timothy E. 2001. Plant community responses to livestock grazing: An assessment of alternative management practices in a semiarid grassland. In: Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 80-87.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.