Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (328 KB)

Title: Projected economic impacts of a 16-Inch tree cutting cap for ponderosa pine forests within the greater Flagstaff urban-wildlands

Author: Larson, Debra; Mirth, Richard;

Date: 2001

Source: In: Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 154-160.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: The Grand Canyon Forest Partnership (GCFP), located in Flagstaff, AZ, has implemented a 16-inch diameter breast height cutting cap in the Fort Valley Restoration (Phase One) Project to secure the support of environmental organizations for urban interface forest restoration and fuels reduction projects. This paper provides insights into the economic impacts of this limitation by applying a simulated cap to realistic inventory, logging, and revenue models developed from an earlier representative project - the GCFP's 332-acre Fort Valley Research and Demonstration (R&D) project. The simulation was possible on only four of the nine R&D units, as these were the only units that had trees greater than or equal to 16-inch d.b.h. available for cutting. The simulated cutting cap resulted in implementation cost increases of 5 to 19.4 percent, harvested fiber decreases of 10 to 39 percent on a volume basis, and reductions in operator net returns ranging from 22.3 to 176 percent. The primary market for harvested material, at the time of this analysis, was low-value firewood and pallet stock that was supplemented by occasional sales to high-value users of large diameter logs. The 16-inch cap limited the operators' ability to broker logs to these large diameter users (for example, small volume viga manufacturers located in the Phoenix, AZ, metropolitan area) who would pay upward of $200 per ccf. Projections showed, however, that under more favorable market conditions, such as that of a regional pulp mill or oriented strand board plant, the operators (and consequently the GCFP) could better sustain, economically, the 16-inch cutting cap.

Keywords: ponderosa pine, ecosystem management, landscape management, restoration, conservation, fire behavior, cost effectiveness analysis

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Larson, Debra; Mirth, Richard. 2001. Projected economic impacts of a 16-Inch tree cutting cap for ponderosa pine forests within the greater Flagstaff urban-wildlands. In: Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 154-160.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.