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Title: Important biological factors for utilizing native plant species

Author: Wiesner, Loren E.;

Date: 1999

Source: In: Holzworth, Larry K.; Brown, Ray W., comps. Revegetation with native species: Proceedings, 1997 Society for Ecological Restoration annual meeting; 1997 November 12-15; Fort Lauderdale, FL. Proc. RMRS-P-8. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 39-43.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Native plant species are valuable resources for revegetation of disturbed ecosystems. The success of these plantings is dependent on the native species selected, quality of seed used, condition of the soil, environmental conditions before and after planting, planting equipment used, time of planting, and other factors. Most native species contain dormant seed. Dormancy in domesticated and wild species can make it difficult to establish stands; however, in wild species seed dormancy is one method of perpetuating the species. Temperature, moisture, and light requirements for germination of each species are important factors to know before planting. Each species has an optimum temperature range in which it will germinate. Successful stand establishment begins in the seed production field or collection area with proper nutrient balance, moisture, weed control, time of harvest, seed drying, seed handling, seed conditioning, and storage. Improper harvesting and storage can quickly reduce seed quality. All of these factors must be considered when using native species for revegetation.

Keywords: restoration, seed production, seed conditioning, succession

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Wiesner, Loren E. 1999. Important biological factors for utilizing native plant species. In: Holzworth, Larry K.; Brown, Ray W., comps. Revegetation with native species: Proceedings, 1997 Society for Ecological Restoration annual meeting; 1997 November 12-15; Fort Lauderdale, FL. Proc. RMRS-P-8. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 39-43.

 


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