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Title: Mushrooms in the mist: stalking the wild chanterelle.

Author: Duncan, Sally.;

Date: 1999

Source: Science Findings. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. March (12): 1-5

Publication Series: Science Findings

Description: Commercial, recreational, and subsistence harvesting of chanterelle mushrooms in Washington's Olympic Peninsula has long been an issue for managers and harvesters alike. What guidelines should be used to manage nontimber products?

Is there concern about possible increased commercial harvesting? Pacific Northwest Research Station scientist Leon Liegel and botanist David Pilz initiated a study to help public and private forest land owners interested in cooperative management of the chanterelle resource. Liegel's and Pilz' study offer insights into who is harvesting and possible guidelines to help the various stakeholders involved work together towards common goals.

The study showed that the productivity of chanterelles varied widely around the Olympic Peninsula. Knowledge of these differences can help define future sampling designs. The selling price of the chanterelle varies greatly depending on the time of season and imports. Ultimately, Liegel and Pilz discovered that the harvesters of non-timber products have common interests and this knowledge can help avoid future conflict and alleviate existing tensions.

Chanterelle harvest has proven to be an excellent example of adaptive ecosystem management. It ultimately demonstrates how complex issues may be resolved by incorporating public participation, monitoring, research, and decision making.

Publication Notes:

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
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Citation:


Duncan, Sally. 1999. Mushrooms in the mist: stalking the wild chanterelle. Science Findings. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. March (12): 1-5

 


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