Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (529 KB)

Title: Patterns of growth dominance in forests of the Rocky Mountains, USA

Author: Binkley, Dan; Kashian, Daniel M.; Boyden, Suzanne; Kaye, Margot W.; Bradford, John B.; Arthur, Mary A.; Fornwalt, Paula J.; Ryan, Michael G.;

Date: 2006

Source: Forest Ecology and Management. 236: 193-201.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: We used data from 142 stands in Colorado andWyoming, USA, to test the expectations of a model of growth dominance and stand development. Growth dominance relates the distribution of growth rates of individual trees within a stand to tree sizes. Stands with large trees that account for a greater share of stand growth than of stand mass exhibit strong growth dominance. Stands with large trees that contribute less to stand growth than to stand mass show reverse growth dominance. The four-phase model predicts that forests move from a period of little dominance (Phase 1), with trees accounting for similar contributions to stand growth and stand mass. Phase 2 is a period of strong growth dominance, where larger trees account for a disproportionately large amount of total stand growth. Growth dominance declines during Phase 3 as growth of the larger trees slows. A final Phase 4 shows reverse growth dominance when the growth of larger trees is less than their proportional contribution to total stand mass. The datasets supported the expectation of reverse growth dominance in old forests of ponderosa pine, Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir, lodgepole pine, and mixed stands of aspen and conifers. Pure aspen stands did not show reverse growth dominance. An age sequence of lodgepole pine failed to show the expected Phase 2 period of strongly developed growth dominance. Future work needs to combine quantitative descriptions of patterns in growth dominance with experimental manipulations of resource supplies and environmental conditions to connect forest dynamics at the scales of individual trees, groups of trees, and stands.

Keywords: age-related decline in forest growth, stand development, competition, Pinus contorta, P. ponderosa, Picea engelmannii, Abies lasiocarpa, Populus tremuloides

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Binkley, Dan; Kashian, Daniel M.; Boyden, Suzanne; Kaye, Margot W.; Bradford, John B.; Arthur, Mary A.; Fornwalt, Paula J.; Ryan, Michael G. 2006. Patterns of growth dominance in forests of the Rocky Mountains, USA. Forest Ecology and Management. 236: 193-201.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.