Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (287 KB)

Title: Tree species effects on soil properties and greenhouse gas fluxes in East-central Amazonia: comparison between monoculture and diverse forest

Author: Van Haren, J.; de Oliveira, Jr., R.C.; Beldini, P.T.; de Camargo, P.B.; Keller, M.; Saleska, S.;

Date: 2013

Source: Biotropica. 45(6): 709-718.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Tropical plantations are considered a viable option to sequester carbon on abandoned agricultural lands, but implications of tree species selection for overall greenhouse gas budgets on plantations have been little studied. During three wet seasons, we investigated the influence of nine tree species on soil pH, temperature (ST), bulk density (BD), moisture content water filled pore space (WFPS), and greenhouse gas fluxes in diverse forest sites and monoculture plantation plots. All sites were on clay-rich soils of the Barreiras formation, in east-central Amaz^onia, Brazil. We found that ST and BD were 0.6°C and 0.2 g/cm3 higher in the plantation relative to the forest, and soil CH4, CO,2 and N2O fluxes were, respectively, 38, 12, 62, percent lower in the plantation. Tree growth rates were highly variable on the plantation, with the mean comparable to the forest sites. Tree species identity mattered (P < 0.01) for all soil properties and gas fluxes on the plantation, but only for pH, BD, WFPS, and N2O fluxes in the forest. The species rank order of pH and N2O fluxes in the forest, however, were unlike the plantation. Tree growth rates were a strong predictor for soil WFPS, and together with location, they also explained 75 percent of the mean N2O flux variation. Our study indicates that: (1) tree species influence soil processes; and (2) high tree growth and low soil gas emissions imply a reduced climate forcing effect from plantations, especially when planted with fast-growing legume species on abandoned farmland.

Keywords: carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, plantation, tree growth, tropical

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Van Haren, J.; de Oliveira, Jr., R.C.; Beldini, P.T.; de Camargo, P.B.; Keller, M.; Saleska, S. 2013. Tree species effects on soil properties and greenhouse gas fluxes in East-central Amazonia: comparison between monoculture and diverse forest. Biotropica. 45(6): 709-718.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.