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Title: New efforts in eastern cottonwood biomass production through breeding and clonal refinement

Author: Cromer, Jason W.; Rousseau, Randall J.; Herrin, B. Landis.;

Date: 2014

Source: In: Groninger, John W.; Holzmueller, Eric J.; Nielsen, Clayton K.; Dey, Daniel C., eds. Proceedings, 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 2014 March 10-12; Carbondale, IL. General Technical Report NRS-P-142. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 261-262.

Publication Series: Abstract

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: First generation biofuels (also known as traditional biofuels) primarily use corn to produce ethanol. Newer techniques and knowledge are now allowing ethanol production from renewable resources such as trees that have more complex molecular structures that inhibit access to sugars. Ethanol production is through an enzymatic process which uses cellulose, or pyrolosis which uses lignin from trees. When nonedible renewable resources, such as trees or agricultural crops, are converted into alcohol or some other energy source, they are termed advanced biofuels (second generation biofuels). In order to supply the demand for advanced biofuels, companies are looking for fast-growing species for the production of biomass. Populus species including eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoids) and hybrid poplars (Populus spp.) are key species. Populus breeding programs are developing new individuals to maximize biomass production under plantation settings. Dedicated energy plantations of select Populus species and hybrids, if shown to be economically viable, could provide a significant source of biomass for the southern United States. Although poplars have shown exceptional productivity (tons/acre/year) on suitable sites in the lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV), the key will be to increase adaptability and yields across the south with minimal input over a 3- to 5-year period.

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Citation:


Cromer, Jason W.; Rousseau, Randall J.; Herrin, B. Landis. 2014. New efforts in eastern cottonwood biomass production through breeding and clonal refinement. In: Groninger, John W.; Holzmueller, Eric J.; Nielsen, Clayton K.; Dey, Daniel C., eds. Proceedings, 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference; 2014 March 10-12; Carbondale, IL. General Technical Report NRS-P-142. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 261-262.

 


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