Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (339 KB)

Title: Survival and initial growth attributes of improved and unimproved cherrybark oak in South Arkansas

Author: Adams, Joshua P.; Graves, David; Pelkki, Matthew H.; Stuhlinger, Chris; Barry, Jon;

Date: 2015

Source: In Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 4 p.

Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Thousands of acres are planted every year with genetically improved seedlings; but while pine continues to be extensively explored, the same is not true for hardwoods due to costs and rotation length. An improved cherrybark oak (Quercus pagodaRaf.) seed orchard exists in North Little Rock, AR, providing an opportunity to evaluate hardwood improvement. However, the cost and limited testing of these seedlings have been large limiting factors in their deployment. In February 2012, improved and woods-run seedlings were hand-planted at two sites in southern Arkansas including a site near Hope, AR, and one near Monticello, AR. The sites were treated with 2 ounces per acre of Oust XP® 2 weeks after tree planting with manual control of sumac (Rhus spp.) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) shortly thereafter. A random sample of seedlings at the nursery confirmed that seedling undercutting effectively controlled root length which was statistically the same for both groups at 21.8 inches. However, root collar diameter of an improved seedling was on average 27 percent larger than an unimproved seedling. These trends were similar to those among planted seedlings in which improved seedlings were 9 percent and 8 percent greater in regards to ground line diameter and height, respectively. However, improved seedlings exhibited greater initial mortality, by 6.2 percent, in the first few months of their growing season. While initial mortality is often considered random, disparity between the two groups points to other causes, such as the larger root sizes, which may pose planting problems. In conclusion, these results indicate that genetic improvement has increased 1-0 seedling size, but survivability must be carefully monitored.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Adams, Joshua P.; Graves, David; Pelkki, Matthew H.; Stuhlinger, Chris; Barry, Jon 2015. Survival and initial growth attributes of improved and unimproved cherrybark oak in South Arkansas. In Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 4 p.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.