Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (327 KB)

Title: Soil physical effects on longleaf pine performance in the West Gulf Coastal Plain

Author: Sayer, Mary Anne S.; Haywood, James D.; Sung, Shi-Jean Susana;

Date: 2015

Source: In: Holley, A. Gordon; Connor, Kristina F.; Haywood, James D., eds. Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203, Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 116-125.

Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: We summarize 8 years of soil physical property responses to herbicide manipulation of the understory in two young longleaf pine stands growing on either Ruston fine sandy loam or Beauregard silt loam soils. We also describe relationships between pine sapling vigor and the soil physical environment across a 3-year period on the Ruston soil and a 2-year period on the Beauregard soil. It is hypothesized that understory control affects soil porosity, bulk density, and the ability to store plant-available water by a change in the amount and distribution of non-pine roots. Furthermore, Pinus vigor may be reduced when the inherent physical nature of a soil limits pine root elongation. We observed temporal changes in soil porosity fractions and bulk densities, possibly representing natural soil recovery after disturbance. Near the surface of the soil, soil perturbation by grass roots may have aided pine vigor by increasing the water-holding capacity of soil micropores. In the subsoil, pine vigor was correlated with bulk density and microporosity. Relationships between pine vigor and subsoil physical properties were different between the two soil types. Clay illuviation and sand content in the two soil types may have played a role in these relationships. Our results provide insight regarding soil variables that impart some degree of control on pine root system expansion and tree vigor on the West Gulf Coastal Plain.

Keywords: soil, longleaf pine, Pinus palustris, root system, water

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Sayer, Mary Anne S.; Haywood, James D.; Sung, Shi-Jean Susana. 2015. Soil physical effects on longleaf pine performance in the West Gulf Coastal Plain. In: Holley, A. Gordon; Connor, Kristina F.; Haywood, James D., eds. Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203, Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 116-125.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.