Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (0 bytes)

Title: Differential invasion success of salmonids in southern Chile: patterns and hypotheses

Author: Arismendi, Ivan; Penaluna, Brooke E.; Dunham, Jason B.; Garcia de Leaniz, Carlos; Soto, Doris; Fleming, Ian A.; Gomez-Uchida, Daniel; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Varga, Pamela V.; León-Muñoz, Jorge.;

Date: 2014

Source: Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Biological invasions create complex ecological and societal issues worldwide. Most of the knowledge about invasions comes only from successful invaders, but less is known about which processes determine the differential success of invasions. In this review, we develop a framework to identify the main dimensions driving the success and failure of invaders, including human influences, characteristics of the invader, and biotic interactions. We apply this framework by contrasting hypotheses and available evidence to explain variability in invasion success for 12 salmonids introduced to Chile. The success of Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta seems to be influenced by a context-specific combination of their phenotypic plasticity, low ecosystem resistance, and propagule pressure. These well-established invaders may limit the success of subsequently introduced salmonids, with the possible exception of O. tshawytscha, which has a short freshwater residency and limited spatial overlap with trout. Although propagule pressure is high for O. kisutch and S. salar due to their intensive use in aquaculture, their lack of success in Chile may be explained by environmental resistance, including earlier spawning times than in their native ranges, and interactions with previously established and resident Rainbow Trout. Other salmonids have also failed to establish, and they exhibit a suite of ecological traits, environmental resistance, and limited propagule pressure that are variably associated with their lack of success. Collectively, understandinghow the various drivers of invasion success interact may explain the differential success of invaders and provide key guidance for managing both positive and negative outcomes associated with their presence. Keywords

Keywords: Salmonids, Biological invasions, Propagule pressure, Environmental resistance, Biotic resistance, Non-native species, Chile

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Arismendi, Ivan; Penaluna, Brooke E.; Dunham, Jason B.; Garcia de Leaniz, Carlos; Soto, Doris; Fleming, Ian A.; Gomez-Uchida, Daniel; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Varga, Pamela V.; León-Muñoz, Jorge. 2014. Differential invasion success of salmonids in southern Chile: patterns and hypotheses. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries. 24: 919-941.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.