Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (160 KB)

Title: Nest-location and nest-survival of black-chinned hummingbirds in New Mexico: A comparison between rivers with differing levels of regulation and invasion of nonnative plants

Author: Smith, D. Max; Finch, Deborah M.; Stoleson, Scott H.;

Date: 2014

Source: The Southwestern Naturalist. 59(2): 193-198.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: We compared plants used as sites for nests and survival of nests of black-chinned hummingbirds (Archilochus alexandri) along two rivers in New Mexico. Along the free-flowing Gila River which was dominated by native plants, most nests were constructed in boxelder (Acer negundo). Along the flow-restricted Middle Rio Grande which was dominated by nonnative plants, most nests were constructed in nonnative plants such as Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) and saltcedar (Tamarix). Mean nest height varied among species of plants used as nesting sites but was about 4 m at each study area. Logistic exposure-estimates of survival of nests were considerably higher along the Middle Rio Grande (52%) than the along the Gila River (23%). Survival of nests was influenced by nest height and species of plant used as nesting site, with survival rates of nests greatest at mean heights in Russian olive and saltcedar. Our results highlight considerable variation in nesting characteristics between two study areas and show that subcanopy nest-sites are essential components of productive habitat for this species.

Keywords: black-chinned hummingbirds, Archilochus alexandri, rivers, Gila River, Middle Rio Grande, nesting characteristics

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Smith, D. Max; Finch, Deborah M.; Stoleson, Scott H. 2014. Nest-location and nest-survival of black-chinned hummingbirds in New Mexico: A comparison between rivers with differing levels of regulation and invasion of nonnative plants. The Southwestern Naturalist. 59(2): 193-198.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.