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Title: Logging legacies affect insect pollinator communities in southern Appalachian forests

Author: Jackson, Michelle M.; Turner, Monica G.; Pearson, Scott M.;

Date: 2014

Source: BioOne Southeastern Naturalist. 13(2): 317-336 20 p.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Many temperate deciduous forests are recovering from past logging, but the effects of logging legacies and environmental gradients on forest insect pollinators have not been well studied. In this study, we asked how pollinator abundance and community composition varied with distance from logging roads and elevation in old (logged >90 years ago) and young (logged 20–40 years ago) southern Appalachian forests. Insect pollinators were sampled at 15 previously logged sites along an elevation gradient at 5 distances from logging roads during summer 2010 and spring 2011 using pan traps. In summer, many pollinator groups were more abundant in younger forests and closer to logging roads, likely due in part to more light availability and a greater abundance of floral resources near roads. Total bee abundance was greater near logging roads, but only in younger forests, suggesting that the role of roads in providing nectar and other resources may diminish as forests mature. In spring, many pollinator families were less abundant at mid-distances (2–10 m) from roads compared to road edges (0 m), but abundances were generally the same at 100 m from the road as at road edges. Two important bee families, Apidae and Andrenidae, were strongly associated with high elevations in spring. Our results suggest that logging legacies may provide supplemental resources such as food and nesting sites to insect pollinators during the summer months especially, with the effects of roads often extending at least 100 m into young forests.

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Jackson, Michelle M.; Turner, Monica G.; Pearson, Scott M 2014. Logging legacies affect insect pollinator communities in southern Appalachian forests. BioOne Southeastern Naturalist. 13(2): 317-336 20 p.

 


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