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Title: Asian longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), an introduced pest of maple and other hardwood trees in North America and Europe

Author: Meng, P.S.; Hoover, K.; Keena, M.A.;

Date: 2015

Source: Journal of Integrated Pest Management. 6(1): 4-4.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: The Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), threatens urban and forest hardwood trees both where introduced and in parts of its native range. Native to Asia, this beetle has hitchhiked several times in infested wood packaging used in international trade, and has established breeding populations in five U.S. states, Canada, and at least 11 countries in Europe. It has a broad host range for a cerambycid that attacks living trees, but in the introduced ranges it prefers maples. Identification, classification, and life history of this insect are reviewed here. Eradication is the goal where it has been introduced, which requires detection of infested trees using several approaches, including ground and tree-climbing surveys. Several agencies and researchers in the United States and Europe are evaluating the use of pheromone- and kairomone-baited traps. Control options beyond cutting down infested trees are limited. To date, the parasitoids and predators of this beetle have broad host ranges and are unlikely to be approved in the United States or Europe. An effective delivery system under development for entomopathogenic fungi appears promising. Systemic insecticides have been widely used in the United States, but the ability of these chemicals to reach lethal doses in the crown of large trees is disputed by some scientists, and the potential nontarget effects, especially on pollinators, raise concerns. The most practical approach for eradicating Asian longhorned beetle is to optimize trapping methods using semiochemicals for early detection to eliminate the insect before it spreads over large areas.

Keywords: Anoplophora glabripennis, maple, Acer spp., invasive species

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Citation:


Meng, P.S.; Hoover, K.; Keena, M.A. 2015. Asian longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), an introduced pest of maple and other hardwood trees in North America and Europe. Journal of Integrated Pest Management. 6(1): 4-4.

 


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