Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (806 KB)

Title: Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

Author: Firn, J.; Moore, J.L.; MacDougall, A.S.; Borer, E.T.; Seabloom, E.W.; HilleRisLambers, J.; Harpole, S.; Cleland, E.E.; Brown, C.S.; Knops, J.M.H.; Prober, S.M.; Pyke, D.A.; Farrell, K.A.; Bakker, J.D.; O’Halloran, L.R.; Adler, P.B.; Collins, S.L.; D’Antonio, C.M.; Crawley, M.J.; Wolkovich, E.M.; La Pierre, K.J.; Melbourne, B.A.; Hautier, Y.; Morgan, J.W.; Leakey, A.D.B.; Kay, A.D.; McCulley, R.L.; Davies, K.F.; Stevens, C.J.; Chu, C.J.;

Date: 2011

Source: Ecology Letters 14: 274-281.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites – grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

Keywords: Biogeography, biosecurity, disturbance, global meta-study, homogenization of communities, invasion paradox, mechanisms of invasion, Nutrient Network, plant invasion, propagule pressure.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Firn, J.; Moore, J.L.; MacDougall, A.S.; Borer, E.T.; Seabloom, E.W.; HilleRisLambers, J.; Harpole, S.; Cleland, E.E.; Brown, C.S.; Knops, J.M.H.; Prober, S.M.; Pyke, D.A.; Farrell, K.A.; Bakker, J.D.; O’Halloran, L.R.; Adler, P.B.; Collins, S.L.; D’Antonio, C.M.; Crawley, M.J.; Wolkovich, E.M.; La Pierre, K.J.; Melbourne, B.A.; Hautier, Y.; Morgan, J.W.; Leakey, A.D.B.; Kay, A.D.; McCulley, R.L.; Davies, K.F.; Stevens, C.J.; Chu, C.J. 2011. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities. Ecology Letters. 14: 274-281.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.