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Title: Community composition and structure had no effect on forest susceptibility to invasion by the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

Author: Smith, Annemarie; Herms, Daniel A.; Long, Robert P.; Gandhi, Kamal J.K.;

Date: 2015

Source: Canadian Entomologist. 147(3): 318-328.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a non-native, wood-boring beetle that has caused widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus Linnaeus (Oleaceae)) in eastern North America. During 2004-2007, we determined whether forest community composition and structure of black (F. nigra Marshall), green (F. pennsylvanica Marshall), and white (F. americana Linnaeus) ash stands influenced their susceptibility to EAB invasion in southeast Michigan, United States of America. There was no relationship between EAB-induced ash decline or percentage mortality and any measure of community composition (tree species diversity, stand/ash density, total basal area, or relative dominance of ash). There was also no relationship between measures of EAB impact (density of EAB signs, ash decline rating, percentage ash mortality, or percentage infested ash) and forest attributes (ash/total stand density, basal area, ash importance, or stand diversity). Decline and mortality of black ash advanced more rapidly than that of white and green ash. Percentage mortality of ash increased from 51% to 93% during 2004-2007. Distance from the epicentre of the invasion was negatively correlated with ash mortality, but this relationship dissipated over time. Stand composition data suggests that ash will be replaced by Quercus Linnaeus (Fagaceae), Acer Linnaeus (Sapindaceae), and Tilia Linnaeus (Malvaceae); such vegetation changes will irreversibly alter the structure and function of these forests.

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Citation:


Smith, Annemarie; Herms, Daniel A.; Long, Robert P.; Gandhi, Kamal J.K. 2015. Community composition and structure had no effect on forest susceptibility to invasion by the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Canadian Entomologist. 147(3): 318-328.

 


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