Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (323 KB)

Title: Contrasting distribution patterns of invasive and naturalized non-native species along environmental gradients in a semi-arid montane ecosystem

Author: Andersen, Kelly M.; Naylor, Bridgett J.; Endress, Bryan A.; Parks, Catherine G.;

Date: 2015

Source: Applied Vegetation Science. 18: 683–693.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Questions: Mountain systems have high abiotic heterogeneity over local spatial scales, offering natural experiments for examining plant species invasions. We ask whether functional groupings explain non-native species spread into native vegetation and up elevation gradients.We examine whether non-native species distribution patterns are related to environmental variables after controlling for elevation and, thus, driven by niche processes.

Location: TheWallowa Mountains, northeast Oregon, USA.

Methods: We surveyed non-native plant species along three mountain roads and into the native habitat matrix to assess the extent of invasion success along distance from roadside and elevation gradients. We used GLM to predict single species occurrence probabilities, LMM to examine differences in distribution patterns among functional types, and pCCA to examine multivariate responses of the non-native community to ecological variables.

Results: Probability of occurrence of the eight focal invasive species was not significantly related to distance from the road, but declined with elevation. Nonnative species with annual life history strategies were more restricted to lower elevations than perennial species. Non-native species considered invasive occurred at lower minimum elevations than naturalized species. Shifts in the species composition of the non-native plant community were related to changes in soil and climate variables.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that invasive species have similar patterns of habitat associations and spread from roadsides to interior vegetation zones, whereas naturalized species partition environmental gradients in this semi-arid montane ecosystem. Furthermore, annual and invasive species groups occupy lower elevations and perennial and naturalized species groups have invaded further up the mountain roads and into the native vegetation. Thus, functional groupings may explain contrasting distribution patterns of non-native species and could be used to inform management strategies for non-native species.

Keywords: Community assembly, Disturbance, Elevation gradient, Functional groups, Habitat filtering, Non-native species, Plant invasions, Species turnover

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Andersen, Kelly M.; Naylor, Bridgett J.; Endress, Bryan A.; Parks, Catherine G. 2015. Contrasting distribution patterns of invasive and naturalized non-native species along environmental gradients in a semi-arid montane ecosystem. Applied Vegetation Science. 18: 683-693.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.