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Title: A big blank white canvas? Mapping and modeling human impact in Antarctica

Author: Carver, Steve; Tin, Tina;

Date: 2015

Source: In: Watson, Alan; Carver, Stephen; Krenova, Zdenka; McBride, Brooke, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Tenth World Wilderness Congress symposium; 2013, 4-10 October, Salamanca, Spain. Proceedings RMRS-P-74. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 116-121.

Publication Series: Proceedings (P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Antarctica is certainly what most people would consider being the world's last great wilderness; largely untouched and undeveloped by humans. Yet it is not inviolate - there are scientific bases, tourist operations, expeditions, airstrips and even roads. Although these impacts are by and large limited in extent, their very presence in an otherwise "blank" landscape can have effects on the wilderness that far outweigh their relatively small physical footprint. The vastness of Antarctica and the relatively small size and sparseness of human infrastructure presents its own set of special conditions which force us to re-think and re-imagine the concepts of wilderness quality mapping in large polar wildernesses. Here our task is perhaps not to map out where wilderness is but, rather, to map out where human activities and impacts are. Antarctica's vast size means that a multi-scale approach is required to develop an adequate understanding of the spatial pattern of wilderness and human activities. The disproportionate impact of the first human impact on to the "Blank Canvas" and subsequent fragmentation of the canvas as a result of increasing and scattered impacts need to be taken into account. A conceptual spatial modelling approach is developed and recommendations for future implementation made.

Keywords: wilderness, rewilding, restoration, private lands, biodiversity, conservation, protected areas, economics, community involvement, policy, stewardship, education, spiritual values

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Citation:


Carver, Steve; Tin, Tina. 2015. A big blank white canvas? Mapping and modeling human impact in Antarctica. In: Watson, Alan; Carver, Stephen; Krenova, Zdenka; McBride, Brooke, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Tenth World Wilderness Congress symposium; 2013, 4-10 October, Salamanca, Spain. Proceedings RMRS-P-74. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 116-121.

 


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