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Title: Genomics and the challenging translation into conservation practice

Author: Shafer, Aaron B. A.; Wolf, Jochen B. W.; Alves, Paulo C.; Bergstrom, Linnea; Bruford, Michael W.; Brannstrom, Ioana; Colling, Guy; Dalen, Love; Meester, Luc De; Ekblom, Robert; Fawcett, Katie D.; Fior, Simone; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Hill, Jason A.; Hoezel, A. Rus; Hoglund, Jacob; Jensen, Evelyn L.; Krause, Johannes; Kristensen, Torsten N.; Krutzen, Michael; McKay, John K.; Norman, Anita J.; Ogden, Rob; Osterling, E. Martin; Ouborg, N. Joop; Piccolo, John; Popovic, Danijela; Primmer, Craig R.; Reed, Floyd A.; Roumet, Marie; Salmona, Jordi; Schenekar, Tamara; Schwartz, Michael K.; Segelbacher, Gernot; Senn, Helen; Thaulow, Jens; Valtonen, Mia; Veale, Andrew; Vergeer, Philippine; Vijay, Nagarjun; Vila, Carles; Weissensteiner, Matthias; Wennerstrom, Lovisa; Wheat, Christopher W.; Zielinski, Piotr;

Date: 2015

Source: Trends and Ecology in Evolution. 30(2): 78-87.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: The global loss of biodiversity continues at an alarming rate. Genomic approaches have been suggested as a promising tool for conservation practice as scaling up to genome-wide data can improve traditional conservation genetic inferences and provide qualitatively novel insights. However, the generation of genomic data and subsequent analyses and interpretations remain challenging and largely confined to academic research in ecology and evolution. This generates a gap between basic research and applicable solutions for conservation managers faced with multifaceted problems. Before the real-world conservation potential of genomic research can be realized, we suggest that current infrastructures need to be modified, methods must mature, analytical pipelines need to be developed, and successful case studies must be disseminated to practitioners.

Keywords: genomics, conservation

Publication Notes:

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Shafer, Aaron B. A.; Wolf, Jochen B. W.; Alves, Paulo C.; Bergstrom, Linnea; Bruford, Michael W.; Brannstrom, Ioana; Colling, Guy; Dalen, Love; Meester, Luc De; Ekblom, Robert; Fawcett, Katie D.; Fior, Simone; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Hill, Jason A.; Hoezel, A. Rus; Hoglund, Jacob; Jensen, Evelyn L.; Krause, Johannes; Kristensen, Torsten N.; Krutzen, Michael; McKay, John K.; Norman, Anita J.; Ogden, Rob; Osterling, E. Martin; Ouborg, N. Joop; Piccolo, John; Popovic, Danijela; Primmer, Craig R.; Reed, Floyd A.; Roumet, Marie; Salmona, Jordi; Schenekar, Tamara; Schwartz, Michael K.; Segelbacher, Gernot; Senn, Helen; Thaulow, Jens; Valtonen, Mia; Veale, Andrew; Vergeer, Philippine; Vijay, Nagarjun; Vila, Carles; Weissensteiner, Matthias; Wennerstrom, Lovisa; Wheat, Christopher W.; Zielinski, Piotr. 2015. Genomics and the challenging translation into conservation practice. Trends and Ecology in Evolution. 30(2): 78-87.

 


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