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Title: Species recovery in the United States: Increasing the effectiveness of the Endangered Species Act

Author: Evans, Daniel M.; Che-Castaldo, Judy P.; Crouse, Deborah; Davis, Frank W.; Epanchin-Niell, Rebecca; Flather, Curtis H.; Frohlich, R. Kipp; Goble, Dale D.; Li, Ya-Wei; Male, Timothy D.; Master, Lawrence L.; Moskwik, Matthew P.; Neel, Maile C.; Noon, Barry R.; Parmesan, Camille; Schwartz, Mark W.; Scott, J. Michael; Williams, Byron K.;

Date: 2016

Source: Issues in Ecology, Report Number 20. Ecological Society of America. 27 p.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description:

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) has succeeded in shielding hundreds of species from extinction and improving species recovery over time. However, recovery for most species officially protected by the ESA - i.e., listed species - has been harder to achieve than initially envisioned. Threats to species are persistent and pervasive, funding has been insufficient, the distribution of money among listed species is highly uneven, and at least 10 times more species than are actually listed probably qualify for listing. Moreover, many listed species will require ongoing management for the foreseeable future to protect them from persistent threats. Climate change will exacerbate this problem and increase both species risk and management uncertainty, requiring more intensive and controversial management strategies to prevent species from going extinct.

Keywords: species recovery, Endangered Species Act (ESA), extinction, climate change, management strategies

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Evans, Daniel M.; Che-Castaldo, Judy P.; Crouse, Deborah; Davis, Frank W.; Epanchin-Niell, Rebecca; Flather, Curtis H.; Frohlich, R. Kipp; Goble, Dale D.; Li, Ya-Wei; Male, Timothy D.; Master, Lawrence L.; Moskwik, Matthew P.; Neel, Maile C.; Noon, Barry R.; Parmesan, Camille; Schwartz, Mark W.; Scott, J. Michael; Williams, Byron K. 2016. Species recovery in the United States: Increasing the effectiveness of the Endangered Species Act. Issues in Ecology, Report Number 20. Ecological Society of America. 27 p.

 


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