Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (6.0 MB bytes)

Title:

Using LiDAR to evaluate forest landscapes and health factors and their relationship to habitat of the endangered Mount Graham red squirrel on the Coronado National Forest, Pinaleno Mountains, Arizona [Chap. 12]

Author: Anhold, John; Mitchell, Brent; Wilcox, Craig; Mellin, Tom; Merrick, Melissa; Lynch, Ann; Walterman, Mike; Falk, Donald; Koprowski, John; Laes, Denise; Evans, Don; Fisk, Haans.;

Date: 2015

Source: In: Potter K. M.; Conkling, B. L. Forest Health Monitoring: National Status, Trends, and Analysis 2014. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-209. Asheville NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 133-142.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

Description:

The Pinaleno Mountains in southeastern Arizona represent a Madrean sky island ecosystem that contains the southernmost expanse of spruce-fir forest type in North America. This ecosystem is also the last remaining habitat for the Mt. Graham red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamenis), a federally listed endangered species. Due to a general shift in species composition and forest structure of spruce-fir type forests across the Southwest, the ecosystem is being threatened by large high-severity fires, insect infestation, and a general loss of biodiversity. These risk factors have led the Coronado National Forest to begin a forest restoration effort using LiDAR (light detection and ranging) as a tool for identifying habitat and cataloging forest inventory variables at a landscape level. LiDAR was identified as an efficient tool for filling the data collection needs because field data collection is restricted due to rugged terrain and safety concerns.

Keywords: LiDAR, forest landscapes, Mount Graham red squirrel, Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamenis, spruce-fir forest types

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Anhold, John; Mitchell, Brent; Wilcox, Craig; Mellin, Tom; Merrick, Melissa; Lynch, Ann; Walterman, Mike; Falk, Donald; Koprowski, John; Laes, Denise; Evans, Don; Fisk, Haans. 2015. Using LiDAR to evaluate forest landscapes and health factors and their relationship to habitat of the endangered Mount Graham red squirrel on the Coronado National Forest, Pinaleno Mountains, Arizona [Chap. 12]. In: Potter K. M.; Conkling, B. L. Forest Health Monitoring: National Status, Trends, and Analysis 2014. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-209. Asheville NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 133-142.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.