Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (187.0 KB bytes)

Title: Using adjunct forest inventory methodology to quantify pinyon jay habitat in the great basin

Author: Witt, Christopher;

Date: 2015

Source: In: Stanton, Sharon M.; Christensen, Glenn A., comps. 2015. Pushing boundaries: new directions in inventory techniques and applications: Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) symposium 2015. 2015 December 8–10; Portland, Oregon. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-931. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. p. 302.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Pinyon jays (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) are the principal dispersal agent for pinyon pine seeds in the Great Basin region of the Intermountain West. However, Pinyon jays have exhibited significant population declines over much their range in recent decades, even as pinyon-juniper woodlands appear to have been expanding over the past 150 years. In order to identify and quantify habitat preferences for nesting, seed caching, and general foraging within the woodlands of the Great Basin, we measured stand and tree parameters of Pinyon jay nest, forage and cache sites in Idaho and Nevada using U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) survey methodology. We then compared mean values of site characteristics to data collected from standard Forest Inventory plots in order to quantify habitat across Nevada, which contains most of the Great Basin land area. Sites differed in physical structure, with caching sites having lower canopy cover and higher snag basal area than other sites, and foraging sites having higher shrub cover than other sites. About 26 percent of Nevada’s pinyon-juniper woodlands resemble the caching habitat preferences of the birds in our study, and about 32 percent resemble nest site preferences. However, only about seven percent of the woodlands meet general foraging habitat used in our study. This research identifies a potential limiting resource for pinyon jays in the Great Basin while also showing the utility of adjunct inventory using FIA methodology.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Witt, Chris. 2015. Using adjunct forest inventory methodology to quantify pinyon jay habitat in the great basin. In: Stanton, Sharon M.; Christensen, Glenn A., comps. 2015. Pushing boundaries: new directions in inventory techniques and applications: Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) symposium 2015. 2015 December 8-10; Portland, Oregon. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-931. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. p. 302.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.