Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (8.0 MB bytes)

Title: Maintenance and enhancement of long-term multiple socioeconomic benefits to meet the needs of societies

Author: Song, Nianfu; Shifley, Stephen R.; Bowker, Michael; Emery, Marla R.; Aguilar, Francisco X.; Skog, Kenneth E.;

Date: 2016

Source: In: Shifley, Stephen R.; Moser, W. Keith, eds. Future forests of the northern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-151. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 207-241. Chapter 8.

Publication Series: Book Chapter

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Forests are an important source of timber and nontimber products, recreation, ecological services, and employment in the Northern United States. Timber products are primarily used for building homes; manufacturing flooring, furniture, and cabinets; and making paper and paperboard. Residues from forest harvesting operations and wood processing are used for bioenergy, charcoal, and landscaping mulch. The employment opportunities in forestry range from research and development to logging and manufacturing. Maple syrup is the most prominent nontimber forest product in the North in terms of annual quantity produced and market value. The quantity and value of nontimber products are dwarfed by the wood products and paper industries, but gathering nontimber products has considerable cultural and economic importance for local communities. The dollar value of forest-based recreation is hard to quantify, but the vast majority of people who participate is a strong indicator of its importance to society. In addition, forest-based recreation generates demand for travel and equipment and creates employment for recreation managers and service providers.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • This publication may be available in hard copy. Check the Northern Research Station web site to request a printed copy of this publication.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact Sharon Hobrla, shobrla@fs.fed.us if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Song, Nianfu; Shifley, Stephen R.; Bowker, J.M.; Emery, Marla R.; Aguilar, Francisco X.; Skog, Kenneth E. 2016. Maintenance and enhancement of long-term multiple socioeconomic benefits to meet the needs of societies. In: Shifley, Stephen R.; Moser, W. Keith, eds. Future forests of the northern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-151. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 207-241. Chapter 8.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.