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Title: Exploring the role of wood waste landfills in early detection of non-native alien wood-boring beetles

Author: Rassati, Davide; Faccoli, Massimo; Marini, Lorenzo; Haack, Robert A.; Battisti, Andrea; Petrucco Toffolo, Edoardo.;

Date: 2015

Source: Journal of Pest Science 88 (3): 563-572.

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: Non-native wood-boring beetles (Coleoptera) represent one of the most commonly intercepted groups of insects at ports worldwide. The development of early detection methods is a crucial step when implementing rapid response programs so that non-native wood-boring beetles can be quickly detected and a timely action plan can be produced. However, due to the limited resources often available for early detection, it is important to identify the best locations where to concentrate surveillance efforts. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of wood waste landfills in the early detection of non-native wood-boring beetles. From June to September 2013, insects were collected in multi-funnel traps baited with a multi-lure blend (α-pinene, ethanol, ipsdienol, ipsenol, and methyl-butenol) at the main port and a nearby wood waste landfill in 12 Italian towns. Overall, 74 species of woodboring beetles (Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, and Scolytinae) were trapped, among which eight were non-native to Italy. We found that species richness and species abundance of both non-native and native beetles were significantly higher in the wood waste landfill than in the ports. However, the non-native and native communities were similar in the two environments. The main conclusion emerging from this study is that wood waste landfills, given their similarity with ports of entry, should be considered when surveying for non-native wood-boring beetles. Therefore, within the framework of creating long-term monitoring programs that include both coastal and continental areas, both ports and wood waste landfills should be monitored to improve the probability for early detection of non-native species.

Keywords: Bark beetles, Invasive species, Jewel beetles, Longhorn beetles, Surveillance, Wood packaging materials

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Rassati, Davide; Faccoli, Massimo; Marini, Lorenzo; Haack, Robert A.; Battisti, Andrea; Petrucco Toffolo, Edoardo. 2015. Exploring the role of wood waste landfills in early detection of non-native alien wood-boring beetles. Journal of Pest Science 88 (3): 563-572.

 


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