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Title: Ecology of snowshoe hares in southern boreal and montane forests [Chapter 7]

Author: Hodges, Karen E.;

Date: 2000

Source: In: Ruggiero, Leonard F.; Aubry, Keith B.; Buskirk, Steven W.; Koehler, Gary M.; Krebs, Charles J.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Squires, John R. Ecology and conservation of lynx in the United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-30WWW. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 163-206.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Snowshoe hares occur in many of the montane and sub-boreal forests of the continental United States, as well as throughout the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska. Population dynamics in their southern range were previously thought to be noncyclic, in contrast to the strong 10-year fluctuation that typifies boreal populations of snowshoe hares. Time series data and studies of hare demography indicate that northern and southern populations of hares may instead have similar population dynamics. Hares in southern areas appear to experience two- to 25-fold fluctuations in numbers with peaks eight to 11 years apart. Peak and low densities may be lower in southern areas than in northern ones; in the south, peak densities are commonly one to two hares/ha, whereas northern hare populations commonly have peak densities up to four to six hares/ha. Demographically, survival estimates (30-day) range from approximately 0.65-0.95 in Wisconsin, with lowest survival occurring as populations decline; these values parallel those of cyclic hares in Yukon. Annual reproductive output may vary regionally, but interpretation of this pattern is hindered by noncomparable methodologies.

Keywords: lynx, snowshoe hares, ecology, habitat, northern lynx, southern lynx, lynx management

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Hodges, Karen E. 2000. Ecology of snowshoe hares in southern boreal and montane forests [Chapter 7]. In: Ruggiero, Leonard F.; Aubry, Keith B.; Buskirk, Steven W.; Koehler, Gary M.; Krebs, Charles J.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Squires, John R. Ecology and conservation of lynx in the United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-30WWW. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 163-206.

 


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