Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (232.0 KB bytes)

Title: Seven year effects of meadow vole herbivory on oak survival

Author: Self, Andrew B.;

Date: 2016

Source: In:Proceedings of the 18th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-212. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 614 p.

Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Seedling mortality due to meadow vole herbivory is often thought to be small scale in nature in hardwood afforestation efforts. However, in some instances, this source of mortality may play a more important role than typically realized. A total of 1,440 bare-root Nuttall oak (Quercus texana Buckley), Shumard oak (Quercus shumardii Buckley), and swamp chestnut oak (Quercus michauxii Nutt.) seedlings were planted in February 2008 on a northwest Mississippi site. Plots received treatment with one of four mechanical site preparation methods. Also, all plots received an initial post planting application of Oust XP®. In year two, one half of plots were selected for treatment with a second application of Oust XP®. Overall, seedling survival was excellent throughout the duration of the study. However, cumulative annual vole induced seedling mortality was significant and did not stabilize until the seventh year after planting. Overall seventh-year survival was 83.7 percent, with vole damage accounting for approximately 79.1 percent of all seedling/sapling mortality to date. Analyses did not detect treatment interaction with vole induced mortality in the first three years of this study. However, seventh year analyses detected significant main effect differences for both mechanical treatment and species related to vole herbivory. Vole herbivory was greater in areas receiving less intensive mechanical treatments, and Nuttall oak was preferentially selected for herbivory. While seedling survival approaching 84
percent is not normally considered poor, at 12.9 percent mortality, the level of vole damage observed in this study is of serious magnitude and may warrant consideration in planting efforts.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Self, Andrew B. 2016. Seven year effects of meadow vole herbivory on oak survival.  In:Proceedings of the 18th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-212. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 4 p.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.