Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (663.0 KB bytes)

Title: Natural canopy damage and the ecological restoration of fire-indicative groundcover vegetation in an oak-pine forest

Author: Brewer, J. Stephen;

Date: 2016

Source: Fire Ecology

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: An important goal of restoring fire to upland oak-dominated communities that have experienced fire exclusion is restoring groundcover plant species diversity and composition indicative of fire-maintained habitats. Several studies have shown that fire alone, however, may not be sufficient to accomplish this goal. Furthermore, treatment-driven declines in rare forest specialists could negate the benefits of ecological restoration in these ecosystems. I present the results of an experiment examining effects of tornado-generated canopy openings and biennial spring burning on groundcover vegetation at an oak-pine forest in north Mississippi, USA. Results from four years of monitoring showed that species richness and abundance of species indicative of fire-maintained open habitats were greater at sites with canopy damage than at sites with undamaged canopies, especially in years without drought. Annual ruderals increased initially following canopy damage but then decreased. Few forest indicator species changed in abundance, and the few that did increased. Canopy openings appeared to have a greater effect than fire on groundcover vegetation, although some legumes and panicgrasses appeared to benefit directly from fire.

Keywords: canopy damage, diversity, forest, groundcover, habitat, herb, indicator species, North American Coastal Plain, restoration

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Brewer, J. Stephen 2016. Natural canopy damage and the ecological restoration of fire-indicative groundcover vegetation in an oak-pine forest. Fire Ecology 12(2):105-126.  10.4996/fireecology.1202105

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.