Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (419.0 KB bytes)

Title: Soil heating during the complete combustion of mega-logs and broadcast burning in central Oregon USA pumice soils

Author: Smith, Jane E.; Cowan, Ariel D.; Fitzgerald, Stephen A.;

Date: 2016

Source: International Journal of Wildland Fire. 25(11): 1202-1207

Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)

Description: The environmental effect of extreme soil heating, such as occurs with the complete combustion of large downed wood during wildfires, is a post-fire management concern to forest managers. To address this knowledge gap, we stacked logs to create ‘mega-log’ burning conditions and compared the temperature, duration and penetration of the soil heat pulse in nine high intensity burned (HB) plots paired with adjacent masticated and broadcast burned low intensity burned (LB) plots at different soil depths (0, 5, 10 and 30 cm) in a Pinus ponderosa stand with volcanic pumice soils. Maximum soil surface temperatures ranges were 424–1168°C with a mean and standard error of 759 ± 9°C in the HB treatment and 42–360°C (107 ± 43°C) in the LB treatment. In the HB treatment, temperatures causing fine root and soil organism mortality (>60°C) penetrated the soil to at least 10 cm, but were not recorded at 30 cm. In the HB treatment, mean duration above 60°C at 0–10 cm persisted for 4–13 h (7.61 ± 1.02 h). Soils in the LB treatment experienced lethal temperatures at the surface for about an hour (1.19 ± 0.70 h) and at 5 cm were mostly well below lethal temperatures with the exception of one at 57°C and another at 100°C that remained above 60°C for 1.4 h. Large areas of high burn severity may affect long-term forest productivity. Our quantification of soil heating establishes conditions for ongoing studies investigating the effects of soil burn severity on tree seedling growth, soil fungi and nutrients.

Keywords: fire intensity, fire severity, fuel reduction, post-fire impacts

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Smith, Jane E.; Cowan, Ariel D.; Fitzgerald, Stephen A. 2016. Soil heating during the complete combustion of mega-logs and broadcast burning in central Oregon USA pumice soils. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 25(11): 1202-1207.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.