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Title: Wood decay fungi of subalpine conifer forests

Author: Glaeser, Jessie A.; Smith, Kevin T.;

Date: 2016

Source: In: Proceedings, 8th Western Hazard Tree Workshop; 2016 October 17-20; Bend, OR. [Place of publication unknown]: Western International Forest Disease Working Committee: 21-47.

Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)

Description: One of the fundamental skills needed for hazard tree assessment is the evaluation of decay. This may be a difficult task as we usually only use external symptoms (wounds, basal swellings, decayed branch stubs), signs (mushrooms, fungal crusts or brackets) or mechanical/indirect sampling methods (drilling, electrical or sonic resistance) to estimate the amount of sound versus decayed wood. The ability to identify fruiting bodies of wood decay fungi can give the assessor additional information on the type and extent of decay in the tree. For example, the presence of a single fruiting body of Fomitopsis (=Fomes) officinalis usually indicates extensive heartwood decay while a single fruiting body of Porodaedalea (=Phellinus) pini suggests a limited decay column above and below the conk (Wallis et al., 1980). In the Midwest, it is usually safe to park a car underneath a boxelder (Acer negundo) with a fruiting body of Hypsizygus ulmarius growing from a pruned branch stub but not one with Polyporus squamosus, a fungus that causes extensive heart rot decay which may lead to failure of major branches (Luley, 2005). In this paper, we will discuss the most common signs and symptoms of decay fungi associated with western conifers at higher elevations.

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Citation:


Glaeser, Jessie A.; Smith, Kevin T. 2016. Wood decay fungi of subalpine conifer forests. In: Proceedings, 8th Western Hazard Tree Workshop; 2016 October 17-20; Bend, OR. [Place of publication unknown]: Western International Forest Disease Working Committee: 21-47.

 


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