Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (179.0 KB bytes)

Title: Identification of five new hosts of Phytophthora ramorum in an infested forest in California

Author: Rooney-Latham, S.; Blomquist, C.L.; Williams, A.; Gunnison, E.; Pastalka, T.;

Date: 2017

Source: Proceedings of the sudden oak death sixth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. GTR-PSW-255. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 83-84.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Phytophthora ramorum causes stem and bole cankers (sudden oak death) and foliar and twig dieback (ramorum blight) of susceptible plants. To date, more than 100 tree, shrub and herbaceous hosts of P. ramorum have been identified. In March 2015, plant samples were submitted to the CDFA Plant Pest Diagnostics Lab from the Marin Municipal Water District for disease analysis. The samples were collected near Bolinas Ridge in Marin County, CA in a maritime chaparral-live oak woodland forest with a history of P. ramorum and P. cinnamomi. The collectors noticed a large amount of unusual die-back in many plant species earlier in the drought year and were concerned that the plants were infected with P. cinnamomi or other Phytophthora root pathogens. Manzanita species (Arctostaphylos canescens, A. sensitiva, A. virgata), chinquapin (Chrysolepis chrysophylla) and chaparral pea (Pickeringia montana) were submitted for diagnosis. Isolation from the roots onto PARP media from samples was attempted even though the roots appeared healthy. No Phytophthora sp. grew on isolation plates and no Phytophthora spp. were detected from the roots using the Agdia Phytophthora spp. specific immunoassay. The Arctostaphylos and Pickeringia montana samples contained foliar tissue with leaf spot, vein necrosis and stem canker symptoms which were tested separately for Phytophthora. Phytophthora spp. was detected from the leaf spots and stem cankers from the Pickeringia montana and some of the Arctostaphylos spp. by immunoassay. In addition, P. ramorum was detected in culture and confirmed by sequence analysis from the symptomatic foliage of these hosts.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

XML: View XML

Citation:


Rooney-Latham, S.; Blomquist, C.L.; Williams, A.; Gunnison, E.; Pastalka, T. 2017. Identification of five new hosts of Phytophthora ramorum in an infested forest in California. In: Frankel, Susan J.; Harrell, Katharine M., tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death sixth science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. GTR-PSW-255. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 83-84.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.