Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (10.0 MB bytes)

Title: “Sunshine, sweat, and tears”: African-American ties to land and forests in the south

Author: Schelhas, John; Hitchner, Sarah; Johnson Gaither, Cassandra; Jennings, Viniece.;

Date: 2017

Source: e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-220. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station.

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

Description: The Sustainable Forestry and African American Land Retention Program is a comprehensive effort to address the longstanding problem of under-participation of African Americans in forest management. This report describes the results of rapid appraisal baseline research for pilot projects in this program in three Southern States. The research used a carefully selected purposive sample and was designed to enhance our understanding of minority land ownership and forest management. African-American landowners interviewed valued land highly for its connections to earlier generations and were nearly unanimous in wanting future generations to retain their land. However, heirs’ property status often results in insecure property ownership, and most families received little or no economic return from their land. Forest stands tend to be naturally regenerated pine forests that require thinning, burning, or even complete harvest and replanting if owners are to benefit economically from forestry. Limited experience with forestry in the African-American community and a history of inequities and distrust create a challenging situation. Many forests have been unmanaged and require family landowners to both implement forestry practices that are unfamiliar and engage forestry professionals for the first time. Sustainable forest management can facilitate land retention, but landowners often require time and assistance to engage family members, consider options, and resolve ownership issues.

Keywords: African-American forest owners, family forestry, heirs’ property.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Schelhas, John; Hitchner, Sarah; Johnson Gaither, Cassandra; and Jennings, Viniece. 2017. “Sunshine, sweat, and tears”: African-American ties to land and forests in the south. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-220. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 154 p.

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.