Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (305 KB bytes)

Title: Photosynthetic Potential Of Laurel Oak Seedlings Following Canopy Manipulation

Author: McLeod, K.W.; Burke, Marianne K.;

Date: 2004

Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 513-519

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Abstract The theory of forest gap dynamics predicts that replacement individuals are those that can most fully use the light environment of a gap. Along the Coosawhatchie River in South Carolina, 12 canopy gaps were identified in a bottomland hardwood forest dominated by laurel oak (Quercus laurifolia Michaux). Each gap was enlarged to a uniform size by girdling large trees and removing smaller ones. In each gap, some plots were trenched, while some plots were left intact. Other plots, located in adjacent closed canopy forest, were treated identically. Photosynthetic light response curves of laurel oak seedlings were determined after gap enlargement. Seedling photosynthetic rates were significantly greater in gaps than under closed canopy for all light levels ≥150 µmol/m2 per second. Maximum photosynthetic rates were approximately 50 percent of that for seedlings growing in full sunlight. Trenching, which eliminates root competition and increases availability to soil resources, did not affect photosynthesis. Based on these observations, laurel oak seedlings growing in gaps should have greater photosynthesis than those existing under full canopy.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


McLeod, K.W.; Burke, Marianne K. 2004. Photosynthetic Potential Of Laurel Oak Seedlings Following Canopy Manipulation. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 513-519

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.