Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (1.0 MB byte)

Title: The Insect Guild of White Oak Acorns: Its Effect on Mast Quality in the Ozark and Ouachita National Forests

Author: Mangini, Alex C.; Perry, Roger W.;

Date: 2004

Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-74. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 79-82

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Abstract - Hardwood regeneration, especially of oaks, is an essential component of ecosystem management in the Ouachita and Ozark Mountains of Arkansas. In addition, oak mast is an important wildlife food. Several species of insects inhabit and consume acorns. Data on the insect guild inhabiting white oak (Quercus alba L.) acorns were collected from two undisturbed mature (control) and two single-tree selection stands in the Ouachita and Ozark National Forests from 1993-1998. Insects collected were: weevils of the genus Curculio and Conotrachelus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); filbertworm, Melissopus latifereanus (Walsingham) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae); acorn moth, Valentinia glandulella Riley (Lepidoptera: Blastobasidae), cynipid gall wasps (stone galls) (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) and midge larvae (Diptera). Over the 5 years of study, sound acorns averaged 31.9 percent. Curculio weevils, with an average infestation rate of 26.6 percent, were the most abundant acorn-infesting insect. Other insect species occurred in much smaller numbers.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Mangini, Alex C.; Perry, Roger W. 2004. The Insect Guild of White Oak Acorns: Its Effect on Mast Quality in the Ozark and Ouachita National Forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-74. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 79-82

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.