Skip to page content
USDA Forest Service
  
Treesearch

Research & Development Treesearch

 
Treesearch Home
About Treesearch
Contact Us
Research & Development
Forest Products Lab
International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Northern
Pacific Northwest
Pacific Southwest
Rocky Mountain
Southern Research Station
Help
 

Science.gov - We Participate


USA.gov  Government Made Easy


Global Forest Information Service

US Forest Service
P.O. Box 96090
Washington, D.C.
20090-6090

(202) 205-8333

You are here: Home / Search / Publication Information
Bookmark and Share

Publication Information

View PDF (174 KB bytes)

Title: Reproducibility and Reliability: How To Define the Population of Trees That Represent Site Quality For Longleaf Pine Plantations

Author: Goelz, J.C.G.; Leduc, Daniel J.;

Date: 2004

Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 189-195

Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: We compared 13 definitions for the subpopulation of “site trees.” Each subpopulation was defined (1) once at base age or at each measurement; (2) by crown class, diameter, or height; and (3) by the number of trees per acre. These subpopulations were applied to base ages of 25 and 50. For base age 25, the subpopulations defined at base age were superior to those defined at each measurement. The subpopulations defined by dominant and codominant trees were slightly superior to the subpopulations defined by the 40 tallest or thickest trees per acre. Generally, subpopulations defined by diameter were superior to subpopulations defined by height, and the subpopulations that included more trees were superior to those that included fewer. For base age 50, there was very little or no benefit from defining the subpopulations at base age. Among the subpopulations defined at each measurement, the one defined as dominant and codominant trees was superior. We selected this subpopulation for our site index modeling work. The results are largely explained by the stability of tree rankings within a plot over time. Ranking with respect to height is much less stable than ranking by diameter. Crown class was unexpectedly stable from measurement to measurement.

Publication Notes:

  • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication. (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)

XML: View XML

Citation:


Goelz, J.C.G.; Leduc, Daniel J. 2004. Reproducibility and Reliability: How To Define the Population of Trees That Represent Site Quality For Longleaf Pine Plantations. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 189-195

 


 [ Get Acrobat ]  Get the latest version of the Adobe Acrobat reader or Acrobat Reader for Windows with Search and Accessibility

USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.