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Title: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects on Forest Ecosystems

Author: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L.;

Date: 1998

Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 332 p

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

Titles contained within Proceedings of the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects on Forest Ecosystems

Description: Industrial air pollution has been identified as one of the primary causes of severe damage to forests of central Europe in the past 30 to 40 years. The mountain forest ecosystems have been affected considerably, resulting in extensive areas of severely deteriorated forest stands (e.g., the Krusne Hory of the Czech Republic or the Izerske and Sudety Mountains along the Polish and Czech border). In addition, the increase of motor vehicles in central Europe has caused a higher amount of nitrogen oxide and hydrocarbon emissions. Under particular weather conditions (high solar radiation, high temperatures, temperature inversions), these compounds may undergo complex chemical transformations resulting in the formation of photochemical smog and a buildup of potentially phytotoxic ozone concentrations. Ozone has already been responsible for injury to ponderosa pine stands in the San Bernardino Mountains in southern California and to forest vegetation in the eastern United States and western Europe. Elevated concentrations of nitrogenous components in photochemical smog and the emissions of ammonia from agricultural activities have caused eutrophication of natural ecosystems, including forests, both in Europe and North America. In addition, changing climatic factors, especially the amount of precipitation, temperature and solar radiation (including ultraviolet-B), modify responses of plants to air pollution, and must be considered when these effects are evaluated.

Keywords: effects on forests, monitoring, nitrogen deposition, ozone, sulfur dioxide

Publication Notes:

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

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Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., technical coordinators 1998. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects on Forest Ecosystems, February 5-9, 1996. Riverside, CA. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 332 p

 


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