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Publication Information

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Title: Subsurface drainage processes and management impacts

Author: Keppeler, Elizabeth T.; Brown, David;

Date: 1998

Source: In: Ziemer, Robert R., technical coordinator. Proceedings of the conference on coastal watersheds: the Caspar Creek story, 6 May 1998; Ukiah, California. General Tech. Rep. PSW GTR-168. Albany, California: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 25-34

Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)

   Note: This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document

Description: Storm-induced streamflow in forested upland watersheds is linked to rainfall by transient, variably saturated flow through several different flow paths. In the absence of exposed bedrock, shallow flow-restrictive layers, or compacted soil surfaces, virtually all of the infiltrated rainfall reaches the stream as subsurface flow. Subsurface runoff can occur within micropores (voids between soil grains), various types of macropores (structural voids between aggregates, plant and animal-induced biopores), and through fractures in weathered and consolidated bedrock. In addition to generating flow through the subsurface, transient rain events can also cause large increases in fluid pressures within a hillslope. If pore pressures exceed stability limits of soils and shallow geologic materials, landslides and debris flows may result.

Keywords: Caspar Creek, subsurface drainage, subsurface flow, rainfall

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Keppeler, Elizabeth T.; Brown, David 1998. Subsurface drainage processes and management impacts. In: Ziemer, Robert R., technical coordinator. Proceedings of the conference on coastal watersheds: the Caspar Creek story, 6 May 1998; Ukiah, California. General Tech. Rep. PSW GTR-168. Albany, California: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 25-34

 


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